AGENCE INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE - AIEA

Vienna International Centre
PO Box 100
1400
VIENNE  (Autriche)
www.iaea.org
M. Yukiya Amano, Director General
Mr Amano served as Chair of the Agency’s Board of Governors from September 2005 to September 2006. He was Japan’s Resident Representative to the Agency from 2005 until his election as Director General in July 2009. He has extensive experience in disarmament and non-proliferation diplomacy, as well as nuclear energy issues. At the Japanese Foreign Ministry, Mr Amano was Director-General for the Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Science Department from 2002 until 2005. He previously served as a governmental expert on the U.N. Panel on Missiles and on the U.N. Expert Group on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education. Mr Amano contributed to the 1995, 2000 and 2005 Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty Review Conferences, and he chaired the 2007 Preparatory Committee for the 2010 Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty Review Conference. A graduate of the Tokyo University Faculty of Law, Mr Amano joined the Japanese Foreign Ministry in April 1972, when he began a series of international postings in Belgium, France, Laos, Switzerland and the United States. Mr Amano was born in 1947, is married and speaks English, French and Japanese.
Mr Amano served as Chair of the Agency’s Board of Governors from September 2005 to September 2006. He was Japan’s Resident Representative to the Agency from 2005 until his election as Director General in July 2009. He has extensive experience in disarmament and non-proliferation diplomacy, as well as nuclear energy issues. At the Japanese Foreign Ministry, Mr Amano was Director-General for the Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Science Department from 2002 until 2005. He previously served as a governmental expert on the U.N. Panel on Missiles and on the U.N. Expert Group on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education. Mr Amano contributed to the 1995, 2000 and 2005 Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty Review Conferences, and he chaired the 2007 Preparatory Committee for the 2010 Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty Review Conference. A graduate of the Tokyo University Faculty of Law, Mr Amano joined the Japanese Foreign Ministry in April 1972, when he began a series of international postings in Belgium, France, Laos, Switzerland and the United States. Mr Amano was born in 1947, is married and speaks English, French and Japanese.
The IAEA is widely known as the world's "Atoms for Peace" organization within the United Nations family. Set up in 1957 as the world's centre for cooperation in the nuclear field, the Agency works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technologies.    The IAEA Secretariat — the international body of staff tasked with running the Agency — is made up of a team of some 2560 multidisciplinary professional and support staff from more than 100 countries. They come from scientific, technical, managerial and professional disciplines. Most of these men and women work at Agency headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Others work at IAEA regional offices in Toronto and Tokyo; liaison offices in New York and Geneva; and research laboratories in Seibersdorf, Austria and Monaco. The organizational framework of the IAEA comprises six major departments: Management, Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Safety and Security, Technical Cooperation and Safeguards. The work of staff in these departments is as diverse as the landscape of peaceful nuclear technologies. Safeguards inspectors and analysts check and verify the whereabouts of sensitive nuclear material. Technical officers run projects that help countries bring fresh water to cities and richer harvests to farmers' fields. Others help scientists to better understand and protect the environment, and some also help medical doctors to prevent and treat diseases. Nuclear experts, radiation specialists and engineers assist countries with meeting safety standards at nuclear plants, or to more safely manage and transport radioactive material. There are also IAEA staff who work behind the scenes in a range of positions, such as computer specialists, book editors and publishers, translators and interpreters, communication professionals, accountants, financial experts and conference organizers. They work to keep systems running, constituencies informed and channels open for the valuable exchanges of information influencing the world's nuclear development.  
The IAEA is widely known as the world's "Atoms for Peace" organization within the United Nations family. Set up in 1957 as the world's centre for cooperation in the nuclear field, the Agency works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technologies.    The IAEA Secretariat — the international body of staff tasked with running the Agency — is made up of a team of some 2560 multidisciplinary professional and support staff from more than 100 countries. They come from scientific, technical, managerial and professional disciplines. Most of these men and women work at Agency headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Others work at IAEA regional offices in Toronto and Tokyo; liaison offices in New York and Geneva; and research laboratories in Seibersdorf, Austria and Monaco. The organizational framework of the IAEA comprises six major departments: Management, Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Safety and Security, Technical Cooperation and Safeguards. The work of staff in these departments is as diverse as the landscape of peaceful nuclear technologies. Safeguards inspectors and analysts check and verify the whereabouts of sensitive nuclear material. Technical officers run projects that help countries bring fresh water to cities and richer harvests to farmers' fields. Others help scientists to better understand and protect the environment, and some also help medical doctors to prevent and treat diseases. Nuclear experts, radiation specialists and engineers assist countries with meeting safety standards at nuclear plants, or to more safely manage and transport radioactive material. There are also IAEA staff who work behind the scenes in a range of positions, such as computer specialists, book editors and publishers, translators and interpreters, communication professionals, accountants, financial experts and conference organizers. They work to keep systems running, constituencies informed and channels open for the valuable exchanges of information influencing the world's nuclear development.  









       

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